Scorpion

Album Review — Scorpion, Drake

I HATE WHEN DRAKE RAPS
DRAKE SINGS TOO MUCH
DRAKE IS A POP ARTIST
DRAKE DOESN’T EVEN WRITE HIS OWN SONGS
DRAKE TOOK AN L
DRAKE DIDN’T START FROM THE BOTTOM
DRAKE IS FINISHED
I LIKE DRAKE’S OLDER STUFF
DRAKE MAKES MUSIC FOR GIRLS
DRAKE THINKS HE’S JAMAICAN
DRAKE IS AN ACTOR
DRAKE CHANGES
ANYBODY ELSE > DRAKE …

 

YEAH YEAH WE KNOW

 

— DRAKE

These are the words that appear in a space normally reserved for some music critic’s thoughts on each album that appears on Apple Music. It seems that for his newest album, Scorpion, Drake decided to use his deep connection with Apple Music to preface his album with a note to the listener: “I hear you. I read y’all’s comments on the web. I’ve seen what they say about me. Now let me address them all.”

“What type of album will this be,” is probably most listener’s thoughts. Would it be the “Take Care” Drake that catapulted him to superstardom? Would it be “radio friendly” Drake that can never seem to make anything less than a platinum record? Wannabe Jamaican 6God Drake; or perhaps he’ll address everything after the silence following Pusha T’s Ether The Story of Adidon to Drake’s Renegade Duppy Freestyle?

Yes.

Yes to it all.

This is no Kanye-backed 7-song album. Scorpion is a 2Pac All Eyez On Me double disc release. Over 25 songs, Drake: begins with his traditional intro track, as if he were his own opener for his headlining concert; addresses — and confirms the rumors of his kid; sings over Noah “40” Shebib tracks; rides the new wave of rap flow; reintroduces some radio-friendly summer anthems; talks about Houston; and drops enough potential Instagram captions to last every “social media influencer” for at least until the next album, just to name a few.

In a time where a half dozen songs can make up an “album” that is more of an appetizer than a full course (looking at you, The Weeknd), the craft of a double disc album is a lost art. If anyone can keep the attention of today’s generation long enough to listen to an hour and a half of music consecutively, it would have to be a larger-than-life mega-star like 2Pac Drake.

Touched on earlier in this review, Scorpion is the culmination of Drake throughout the years. If you’ve ever been a fan of Drake at any point in his career — whether it be the emotional singer, the 6God, or the radio crossover king, Scorpion offers something for you. Whether or not Drake’s attempt to please everyone with one album will succeed or not will be seen in the next few months of blogs, think pieces, and comment sections, where he’ll be watching, reading, and gathering material for his next album.

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